CONTACT US:

 

Estelle Simard, MSW, RSW, ABD - Education

Pronouns: She/Her/Ikwe 
Board member and CEO
The Institute for Culturally Restorative Practices 
P.O. Box 723

Rainy River, Ontario 

P0W1L0
(807) 271-4828
email:

estelle.simard@culturallyrestorativepractices.ca

 

SALES AND EVENT PLANNING:

 

Michael Mosher, BA

Pronouns: He/Him/His

Acting Executive Director

Director of Sales and Marketing

The Institute for Culturally Restorative Practices 

P. O. Box 723

Rainy River, Ontario 
P0W1L0

(807) 271-0554

email: michael.mosher@culturallyrestorativepractices.ca

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Principles of Practice:

The Institute for Culturally Restorative Practice is a value based approach to change management at an individual, family, community, or organizational level.  These core values are a set of behaviors and actions which are based in Indigenous reciprocity.  This means the Institute for Culturally Restorative Practices incorporates at all levels of management: respect, collaboration, authenticity, self-awareness, and empowerment in all areas of engagement. 

 

Further to these values based approaches, the Institute for Culturally Restorative Practices principles of practices are as follows:

 

Culturally Safe Environments

The Institute for Culturally Restorative Practice is committed to creating a culturally safe environment for Indigenous peoples that access a wide array of services – child welfare, mental health, health and wellness, education, and child development services.  Creating culturally safe environments requires organizational change through educational services.

 

Indigenous Worldviews into Service Practice

The Institute for Culturally Restorative Practices promotes the integration of Indigenous worldview into service practice.  The Institute has an appreciation for the Indigenous teachings and how these unique teachings can carefully unfold and evolve into rich Indigenous service practice standards.  The Institute is inspired by 25 years of professional and spiritual mentorship, designed to offer wellness through an Indigenous paradigm.  As a result, the Institute for Culturally Restorative Practices thrives on supporting the development of culturally driven services for Indigenous peoples. 

 

Promotion of Individual and Organizational Self-Discovery

The Institute for Culturally Restorative Practice is an innovated service designed to promote individual and organizational self-discovery by enhancing leadership strategies in culturally restorative practices.  By mentoring and supporting organizational change dynamics an Indigenous perspective can restore an evolving service relationship.  The Institute for Culturally Restorative Practices promotes networking and relationship building as a part of a transformational process.  By working with First Nation communities, organizations, and governments, a process of harmonization can occur. 

 

Personal Transformation for Creating Sustainable Change

The Institute for Culturally Restorative Practices believes in personal transformation for creating sustainable change.  By making our services work for Indigenous children, families, and communities we can achieve better outcomes for the children. A collective process through educational awareness can advance the much needed paradigm shift when working with Indigenous people.  Individual or organizational self discovery through dialectic change models is a necessary component to the culturally restorative practice change model. 

 

Indigenous Self-Determination

Finally, the Institute for Culturally Restorative Practices is devoted to empowering Indigenous Nations to champion their own membership.  The Institute seeks to support the Indigenous development of sacred responsibility in caring for each other.  With culturally restorative research models and the use of cultural attachment strategies, Indigenous worldviews can evolve in service standards.